Author Archives: - Page 2

Ibogaine

Ibogaine is a naturally occurring psychoactive substance found in a number of plants, principally in a member of the Apocynaceae family known as iboga (Tabernanthe iboga). Iboga -containing preparations are used in medicinal and ritual purposes within African spiritual traditions of the Bwiti, who claim to have learned it from the Pygmy. In recent times, it has been identified as having anti-addictive properties. Ibogaine is an indole alkaloid that is obtained either by extraction from the iboga plant or by semi-synthesis from the precursor compound voacangine, another plant alkaloid. A full organic synthesis of ibogaine has been achieved but is too expensive and challenging to produce any commercially significant yield. In the early 1960s, anecdotal reports appeared concerning ibogaine's effects. Since that time, it has been the subject of investigation into its abilities to interrupt addictions to methadone, heroin, alcohol, and cocaine. It is thought that ibogaine may have potential to facilitate introspection, helping to elucidate the psychological issues and behavior patterns that drive addictions or other problems. However, ibogaine therapy for drug addiction is the subject of some controversy. Due to safety concerns, it has been placed in the strictest drug prohibition schedules in the United States and a handful of other countries. Canada and Mexico both allow ibogaine therapy facilities to operate and openly contribute to further understanding of the detoxification and therapeutic process that ibogaine has the potential to facilitate. While iboga prohibition in the has slowed scientific research into its anti-addictive properties, the use of ibogaine…
Continue Reading

Ibogaine – Recreational use

Casual use of ibogaine in a social or entertainment context is nearly unknown due to its high cost, constrained availability, long duration of effects, and uncomfortable short-term side effects. In the clandestine markets, ibogaine is typically sought as a drug addiction treatment, for ritual spiritual purposes, or psychological introspection.
Continue Reading

Ibogaine – Formulations

In Bwiti religious ceremonies, the rootbark is pulverized and swallowed in large amounts to produce intense psychoactive effects. In Africa, iboga rootbark is sometimes chewed, which releases small amounts of ibogaine to produce a stimulant effect. Ibogaine is also available in a total alkaloid extract of the Tabernanthe iboga plant, which also contains all the other iboga alkaloids and thus has only about one-fifth the potency by weight as standardized ibogaine hydrochloride. Total alkaloid extracts of T. iboga are often loosely called "Indra extract". However, that name actually refers to a particular stock of total alkaloid extract produced in Europe in 1981. The fate of that original stock (as well as its original quality) is unknown. Currently, pure crystalline ibogaine hydrochloride is the most standardized formulation. It is typically produced by the semi-synthesis from voacangine in commercial laboratories. Ibogaine has two separate chiral centers which means that there a four different stereoisomers of ibogaine. These four isomers are difficult to resolve. A synthetic derivative of ibogaine, 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC), is a selective α3β4 antagonist that was developed collaboratively by the neurologist Stanley D. Glick (Albany) and the chemist Martin E. Kuehne (Vermont). This discovery was stimulated by earlier studies on other naturally occurring analogues of ibogaine such as coronaridine and voacangine that showed these compounds also have anti-addictive properties.
Continue Reading

Ibogaine – Pharmacodynamics

Among recent proposals for ibogaine mechanisms of action is activation of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) pathway in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the brain. The work has principally been accomplished in preclinical ethanol research, where 40 mg/kg of ibogaine caused increases of RNA expression of GDNF in keeping with reduction of ethanol intake in the rat, absent neurotoxicity or cell death. Ibogaine is a noncompetitive antagonist at α3β4 nicotinic receptors, binding with moderate affinity. Several other α3β4 antagonists are known, and some of these, such as bupropion (Wellbutrin or Zyban), and mecamylamine, have been used for treating nicotine addiction. This α3β4 antagonism correlates quite well with the observed effect of interrupting addiction. Co-administration of ibogaine with other α3β4 antagonists such as 18-MC, dextromethorphan or mecamylamine had a stronger anti-addictive effect than when it was administered alone. Since α3β4 channels and NMDA channels are related to each other and their binding sites within the lumen bind a range of same ligands ( DXM, PCP), some older sources suggested that ibogaine's anti-addictive properties may be (partly) due to it being an NMDA receptor antagonist. However, ligands, like 18-MC, selective for α3β4- vs. NMDA-channels showed no drop-off in activity. It is suspected that ibogaine's actions on the opioid and glutamatergic systems are also involved in its anti-addictive effects. Persons treated with ibogaine report a cessation of opioid withdrawal signs generally within an hour of administration. Ibogaine is a weak 5HT2A receptor agonist, and although it is unclear how significant this…
Continue Reading

Documentary maker may film his own death

AN ACCLAIMED documentary maker has admitted that he is prepared to die while filming himself taking a powerful hallucinogenic drug that has been hailed as a cure for addiction but linked to a number of deaths around the world. David Graham Scott, who is based in Glasgow, said that he will take the controversial drug, ibogaine, in a film that will form the final part of his trilogy on Scotland's drugs culture. In the documentary, provisionally titled The Quick Fix, Scott intends to overcome his own methadone addiction, which he says has plagued him since he stopped using street heroin and prescribed drugs 15 years ago. Under the supervision of colleagues who are working to set up an ibogaine clinic in London, and a recording team, Scott will be filmed next month undergoing an intense 36-hour hallucinogenic "trip", from which he hopes to emerge free from his addiction. Although the substance is legal in the UK, where it is classed as an unlicensed, experimental drug, there are wider concerns over its safety. The drug has been banned in the US, Belgium and Switzerland and experts also say that in recent years ibogaine is known to have contributed to at least four deaths in Europe. Last year, a 35-year-old woman died after taking 500mg of the drug during an informal ibogaine session in Germany. In 2001, an inquest in London into the case of JW, a 40-year-old heroin addict, ruled that the man had died principally from a fatal reaction to…
Continue Reading

Iboga Root Bark

Iboga Root Bark is a yellowish root of the Iboga tree which contains beneficial alkaloids, which is used to treat addiction and also enrich one spiritually. The bark of the root is shaved and dried, and then it is processed in a professional laboratory into a pure carrot color powder. Iboga Root Bark has been traditionally used in Africa for many generations, for the purpose of spiritual growth. Nowadays in the western world it is being used for spiritual, therapeutic and addiction-breaking operations. The effects of the root have been known in the local West-African tribes for generations. They use Iboga as traditional medicine and for spiritual purposes. The special effect from the Iboga tree which is listed by the Bwiti tribe as “tree of knowledge” has only been published and known in the Western world for several years. The first reference being made of Iboga in Europe was in a botanical reference from 1889. In 1901 the researchers Dybowski en Landrin were the first who made an extract of the Iboga Root Bark which they called Ibogaine. In the sixties, the addiction-breaking effect was discovered by an American who was a former heroin addict, Howard Lotsof. In taking a dose of Iboga and discovering that he no longer had to suffer withdrawal symptoms. Howard has used this special effect to publish the breaking of addiction among physicians, pharmaceutical companies and addicts. Iboga Root Bark Scientific research shows a drastic reduction in withdrawal symptoms after taking Iboga root bark or…
Continue Reading

Traditional Use

Iboga is central to the Bwiti culture of West Central Africa. The Bwiti make use of Iboga during traditional ceremonies. Iboga is also used as a medicine for several ailments. Large doses are taken at the dedication to faith ceremony. On a more regular basis it is eaten in smaller doses in tribal rituals and tribal dances. In smaller doses Iboga is used to stimulate the senses in order to heightened alerts during hunting. Bwitists have been subject to persecution by Catholic missionaries, who to this day are thoroughly opposed to the growing religious movement of Bwiti. Léon M'ba, before becoming the first President of Gabon in 1960, defended the Bwiti religion and the use of iboga in French colonial courts. On June 6, 2000, the Council of Ministers of the Republic of Gabon declared Tabernanthe iboga to be a national treasure.
Continue Reading

Ibogaine Provider

Iboga World Ibogaine Provider , your supplier of guaranteed high quality Tabernanthe Iboga products. Are you looking for a trustworthy Iboga Provider , who supplies High Quality Tabernanthe Iboga products and delivers what you order? Look no further! Iboga World specializes in Iboga products. Your Ibogaine Provider Iboga World has its own plantations in the country of origin to ensure the best quality and the best price. Quality is assured! This is evident by the positive feedback from the clients, treatment centers as well as individual consumers. Not only will you be receiving a top quality product but we are obligated to supply our customers with what they have ordered and paid for because the customer will be able to complete the transaction online via credit card or direct transfers. Giving you total peace of mind. Iboga World supplies to the most reputable treatment centers in the world The owner is committed to not only helping individuals break the habit but also to enrich their lives after treatment. If you would like more information about the quality of the products you are welcome to contact us Iboga World is a reputable and trustworthy supplier of Iboga and guarantees a quality product. Please visit our website: Ibogaine Provider email us at Kind regards Iboga World Team Your Ibogaine Provider
Continue Reading