Google+
Iboga Shop
Twitter
LinkedIn
YouTube
RSS
Facebook

Ibogaine – In popular culture

Ibogaine first appeared in popular culture in the writings of Hunter S. Thompson. While covering the Wisconsin primaries of the 1972 U.S. Presidential primaries for Rolling Stone magazine, Thompson claimed that presidential candidate Edmund Muskie showed symptoms of being under the influence of Ibogaine. This assertion was later revealed by Thompson to be false, one that he had planted as media bait. He himself was surprised when the leading media outlets picked up the story and ran with it.

It also appeared in the seventh episode of the eleventh season of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. In the episode, Doctor Huang administers Ibogaine to a heroin addict so that he can testify against a murderer

buy ibogaine Ibogaine   In popular culture

Iboga Root Bark

rootbark  Iboga Root Bark

Iboga Root Bark

is a yellowish root of the Iboga tree which contains beneficial alkaloids, which is used to treat addiction and also enrich one spiritually.

The bark of the root is shaved and dried, and then it is processed in a professional laboratory into a pure carrot color powder.

Iboga Root Bark

has been traditionally used in Africa for many generations, for the purpose of spiritual growth. Nowadays in the western world it is being used for spiritual, therapeutic and addiction-breaking operations.

The effects of the root have been known in the local West-African tribes for generations. They use Iboga as traditional medicine and for spiritual purposes. The special effect from the Iboga tree which is listed by the Bwiti tribe as “tree of knowledge” has only been published and known in the Western world for several years. The first reference being made of Iboga in Europe was in a botanical reference from 1889. In 1901 the researchers Dybowski en Landrin were the first who made an extract of the

Iboga Root Bark

which they called Ibogaine.

In the sixties, the addiction-breaking effect was discovered by an American who was a former heroin addict, Howard Lotsof. In taking a dose of Iboga and discovering that he no longer had to suffer withdrawal symptoms. Howard has used this special effect to publish the breaking of addiction among physicians, pharmaceutical companies and addicts.

Iboga Root Bark
Scientific research shows a drastic reduction in withdrawal symptoms after taking Iboga root bark or the extracts which are known as HCL and TA, to the extent that it is almost completely broken. Research shows that 90% of treatments done are successful and even months after the treatment patients do not have the urge to relapse. Apart from breaking addiction it gives the patients clarity and insights into their own lives.

buy ibogaine  Iboga Root Bark

Iboga Root Bark

Documentary maker may film his own death

AN ACCLAIMED documentary maker has admitted that he is prepared to die while filming himself taking a powerful hallucinogenic drug that has been hailed as a cure for addiction but linked to a number of deaths around the world.

David Graham Scott, who is based in Glasgow, said that he will take the controversial drug, ibogaine, in a film that will form the final part of his trilogy on Scotland’s drugs culture. In the documentary, provisionally titled The Quick Fix, Scott intends to overcome his own methadone addiction, which he says has plagued him since he stopped using street heroin and prescribed drugs 15 years ago.

Under the supervision of colleagues who are working to set up an ibogaine clinic in London, and a recording team, Scott will be filmed next month undergoing an intense 36-hour hallucinogenic “trip”, from which he hopes to emerge free from his addiction. Although the substance is legal in the UK, where it is classed as an unlicensed, experimental drug, there are wider concerns over its safety. The drug has been banned in the US, Belgium and Switzerland and experts also say that in recent years ibogaine is known to have contributed to at least four deaths in Europe.

Last year, a 35-year-old woman died after taking 500mg of the drug during an informal ibogaine session in Germany. In 2001, an inquest in London into the case of JW, a 40-year-old heroin addict, ruled that the man had died principally from a fatal reaction to the drug.

But with advocates of the substance claiming it is a “magic bullet” for addicts, the Bafta-nominated film-maker says he now plans to put the claims to the test and undergo the treatment as an experiment to get himself clean.

He said: “There is always a chance that there could be some permanent damage or that it could kill you. But I think the positive factors outweigh the negative aspects. I have found methadone impossible to come off. I am doing this because I can’t stand being an addict anymore. This will be my personal story about taking ibogaine.”

The Quick Fix comes after two films in which Scott examined the issue of drugs and his own reasons for becoming embroiled in Britain’s drug culture in the 1980s. In Little Criminals, Scott spent 1999 filming a group of heroin addicts in and around Glasgow. The film, distributed internationally at film festivals by Scottish Screen, also won him a Bafta new talent nomination last year. Beyond The Highlands, screened by STV in 2002, attempted to answer the question of why Scott, originally from Caithness, turned his back on his rural upbringing and embraced Edinburgh’s underground heroin culture.

“This will be a film that shows how the daily routines that an addict has to face demeans them. I also want this to open up the debate about how society treats addicts and to ask questions about alternatives to the methadone programme,” explained Scott.

“There is ample evidence that ibogaine treatment works and that should be explored further. If I make this film and find that it does work there are serious questions that the government is required to answer about its current drug policy. If anything goes wrong, it will be my sole responsibility.”

Scott, now 41, said he first began researching the effects of ibogaine in the mid-1990s. However, with the only legitimate detox programmes available in a limited number of countries, including Panama, Costa Rica and Italy, and costing thousands of pounds, it was not a feasible option. His unofficial ibogaine detox will cost him just under (pounds) 500.

Once under the effects of the drug, extracted from the root bark of a west African plant and used in spiritual rituals in parts of Gabon, Scott hopes to re-evaluate his life experiences. Less than one gram of ibogaine is said to produce stimulant and aphrodisiac effects. Up to three grams produces a mellow euphoric trip during which the user may experience various hallucinations. Up to six grams, the maximum safe dosage, produces powerful near-death experiences.

Those taking the highest doses of ibogaine report that they first enter a dream-like phase that lasts several hours and consists of vivid visions of past memories. The second consists of high levels of analytical mental activity to comprehend the reasons why they drifted into drug-using.

However, Deborah Mash, a professor of neurology at the University of Miami, a world authority on ibogaine, warned of the dangers of taking the drug outwith a strictly regulated environment.

“It should only be taken in the presence of trained medical staff who can administer drugs or revive someone if they get into difficulty.”

Copyright 2003 SMG Sunday Newspapers Ltd.
Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning Company. All rights Reserved.

buy ibogaine Documentary maker may film his own death

Breaking addiction at home

Breaking addiction using Ibogaine can now be done at home.

Visit Iboga World Ibogaine Shop

Visit Iboga World Forum

The Session

An hour after administration the person will express a desire to lay down and get comfortable. A quiet, darkened room, especially prepared in a personalized, though non-distracting, manner is made available for this purpose. The room is darkened because light bothers most people on Iboga. The room is quiet because sound is usually experienced in an amplified and oscillating way. The subject generally experiences ataxia during movement, which is loss of muscular coordination similar to drunkenness. Since the ataxia is sometimes accompanied by vomiting, he or she is asked to lay still with the least amount of motion as possible.

When closing the eyes, approximately 75% of people experience dream-like visions. However, when the person opens his/her eyes and are talked to, there seem to be no real visual or auditory distortions and some level of communication is possible but usually not preferred by the person. People describe the visionary and auditory elements of the Iboga experience as a state of “dreaming wide awake.” Visions can occur in a repetitive mode. They often report visualizing a rapid run-through of their lives and/or the lives of family members, even of those who have already past away. They have noted the ability of going both backward and forward in time and being able to come to an understanding of their spiritual roots. The visions may appear to be actual memories running, rather as though a film of one’s life was being shown inside the head, or may take the form of characters acting out roles, rather as though a play was taking place inside the head. The person ingesting the iboga may seem to journey backward in time and to re-experience significant life events. He or she is sometimes brought to the place where the core issue that helped facilitate the addiction took began. The emotional content of that experience is relived, along with the visual, pictorial gestalt of the experience itself. In most cases, the experience is complete with 3-D effects and the sensation of actually “being there.” Yet, there is also the presence of the witnessing self, who watches and finds understanding. It is this understanding that seems to allow the former addict to begin again, making new, healthy choices.

Many people perspire heavily and are advised to wear comfortable shirts/pants that can be easily replaced. The first stage takes place for about four to eight hours.

In the second stage, that can last approximately 30 to 40 hours, several things can happen. Some people still experience a dream-like period, although it is supposedly less intense. There is time to evaluate the visionary experiences, which can bring about profound insight into life and death and the reasons behind addictive behavior. Some people request something to drink and/or very light food like fruit. The person usually stays awake most of the time.

During the third stage most people fall asleep for a couple of hours, after which they generally awake feeling rested, very hungry and in need to wash up. In the course of this day most people are able to resume normal activities. People usually stay free of cravings for several months

The possible amount and intensity of released material can be so overwhelming, that people have said that they simply could not remember everything they had seen, or that it took months to remember certain visions. Therefore, the processing of released material and the ability to verbalize these matters and learn to interpret their often symbolic content can take extended amounts of time and continue over years. Subjects have reported experiencing a mental or spiritual transformation due to the Iboga which they compare to ten years of therapy in 2 days, or taking a “truth-serum.” Whatever people report on their experiences, they have been observed returning from their Iboga experiences with a greater understanding of previously made choices
buy ibogaine The Session

Cheap treatment

Ibogaine is a cheap and effective treatment for addiction.

Visit Iboga World Ibogaine Shop

Visit Iboga World Forum

buy ibogaine Cheap treatment

No withdrawal symptoms

Ibogaine is an amazing cure for addiction with no withdrawal symptoms, It’s a miracle.

Visit Iboga World Ibogaine Shop

Visit Iboga World Forum

buy ibogaine No withdrawal symptoms